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that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroes. it's a cross-cultural drama. c-span: your credit -- i think it is an outfit called lyndhurst of chattanooga -- and the macarthur of chicago and the ford foundation as places that have given you money over the years; is the right? >> guest: yes. after "parting the waters" came out, because this book has taken nine years. the ford foundation gave me my first and only a research grant that i used to hire somebody for tw
might say was bittersweet to me because i knew dr. king, i knew him the last two years of his life and i am bitter because of the way that he was taken from us because of hatred in this country. i guess we can start at the beginning because the beginning of the but you were on the mall with dr. king and near the end you are near the mall again 50 years later with a monument that you helped design. >> guest: in between coming back so many times on different occasions to the mall, so it seems like a i lived in washington a short time that had a symbolic meaning for my life and sentimental. every time i come back i have all these memories. >> host: it's a beautiful city. you were 19-years-old in 1963. you were on the mall. the march on washington where dr. king gave that iconic address, i have a dream. how did you happen to go there? >> guest: part of it is i grew up in a small town where there weren't many black people. i think there were three black families growing up in los alamos. so i'd always been fascinated by what was the black community like? i didn't have very much exposure to it
your life and cover new insights as a historian from the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you? >> guest: it is the 50th anniversary and it is 50 years of mine life of the king legacy and to my coming of age. part of it was to do the to tasks. that my life had been connected to the keying legacy -- king legacy and how king impacted me and i was involved with this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> host: it is an excellent reid and we are of the same generation and i was also coming of age. it was bittersweet because i knew dr. king he was my mentor. but bitter because the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred. we can start at the beginning the kids you're on the mall with dr. king and at the end you were there again with 50 years later with the monument you help to design. >> guest: and coming back for important occasions. i only lived in washington a short time but the mall had a great symbolic meaning and sentimental. >> host: it is a beautiful city. 19 years ago, the march on washington where he gave the speech i have a dream. how di
as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the king legacy and yet i felt that there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me. and how i got involved in this journey of editing kinks papers. >> host: it's an excellent read and you and i are of the same generation and i too was coming-of-age in the 60s. and the book i must say was bittersweet for me because i guess week because they knew dr. came. he was my mentor and i knew in the last two years of my life in bitter because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i guess we can start at the beginning he caused at the beginning of your book you are run the mall with dr. came and ere the end of your book you are on the mall again 50 year
at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools and broken down slums, inadequate health care, constant violence, neighborhoods in which to many young people grow up with little hope and peace prospects for the future. >> president obama speaking in 2011 at the dedication of the martin luther king monument on the national mall in washington, d.c. journalist, author tavis smiley has spent the past year criss- crossing the country with activist and professor cornell w
debate. lar larry correia, thank you. >> it's been years since dr. martin luther king gave the "i have a dream" speech. and his niece, alvita king reflects on her uncle's legacy here in . >> mike: and five decades ago, segregation was very much alive in parts of america, a time when a black man couldn't buy a bus ticket at the same window that a white man bought his and couldn't wait for the the bus in the same room as whites and it's important to remember as we do this weekend, the man who led the charge in segregation. >> dr. martin luther king, jr. was a baptist minister from atlanta, georgia. he fought to overturn the jim crowe laws not with violence, but peace. >> we seek nonviolence and passive resistance and still determined to use the weapon of love. >> mike: that was in alabama, where dr. king was leading the montgomery bus boycott to end the days where blacks had to give up their seats for whites, the boycott lasted more than a year until a court put an end to segregation on buses. through the leadership conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the
the charge in segregation. >> dr. martin luther king, jr. was a baptist minister from atlanta, georgia. he fought to overturn the jim crowe laws not with violence, but peace. >> we seek nonviolence and passive resistance and still determined to use the weapon of love. >> mike: that was in alabama, where dr. king was leading the montgomery bus boycott to end the days where blacks had to give up their seats for whites, the boycott lasted more than a year until a court put an end to segregation on buses. through the leadership conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have
of service. [ cheers and applause ] >> and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question. what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. >> chelsea clinton there speaking at the national day of service. monday isn't just inauguration day. also happens to be martin luther king jr. day. and we'll hear from his daughter bernice and find out why she says president obama's second term is actually even more important than the first one. >>> for 29-year-old pushp pushpa basnit, 2013 fleas begins on a high note. she was named cnn hero of the year for her work providing a home for children of incarcerated parents in nepal. i sat down with her after the big moment. how do you feel? you've just won. >> i think i'm dreaming. it's a big honor for me. i will never forget this night in my life. >> what was going through your mind when you were walking up on stage? >> we all are winners, definitely. i've seen my dream come true. thank you very much. i'm still -- definitely this is going
larry correia, thank you. >> it's been years since dr. martin luther king gave the "i have a dream" speech. and his niece, alvita king reflects on her uncle's legacy here in this landmark year when we return. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing e all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all wa
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealous. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
admiration for on an mlk day, president clinton making a reference to dr. king during his speech. >> 34 years ago, the man whose life we celebrate today spoke to us down there at the other end of the small -- this mall in words that move the conscious of the nation. like a profit of old, he told of his dream that one day, america would rise up and treat all of its citizens as equals. before the law and in the hearts. martin luther king's dream was the american dream. his quest is our request. the ceaseless striving to live out our troops greeted. our history has been built on such dreams and laborers. and, by our dreams and laborers, we will redeem the promise of america in the 21st century. >> from 1997, to a live view of washington, d.c. to the area around where the presidential parade will take place. reference to dr. martin luther king. one could suspect the president will make an even longer reference tomorrow. >> i would think so. tomorrow is particularly historic, in civil rights history. 50 years ago that dr. king made his "i have a dream" speech on the mall. 50 years ago, the assassi
that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> barack obama was a little- known state senator from an aillinois. the third african-american in the u.s. senate. i spoke to him after his great victory in illinois at a time when most people knew him as a skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. the phrase you have been accustomed to using, the skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. beyond that issue, how did you get beyond getting beyonpeople o vote for a guy whose name they could not renounce? >> they still screw it up sometimes. the call me alabama or yo mama. one thing that i confirmed in this race is the american people are decent people. they get confused sometimes. they're busy. there stressed. they are tired. sometimes they are watching fox news, that will ge
the dr. martin luther king jr. whose birthday was yesterday and we'll celebrate monday the same day as obama's inauguration. it signifies how dr. king's activism was not just geared towards racial injustice but every bit as much towards social justice as well. while our country has made significant strides in racial equality it very. soften seemsoften it seems we're going the opposite way against poverty with nearly 50 million people now living at or beneath poverty. carrying the torch and renewing the battle against poverty is television and radio host author, activist tavis smily. now tavis's goal is to reduce poverty in half in ten years and completely eradicate it in 25. while that may seem like an impossible goal, let's remember another quote from dr. king. we must accept finite disappointment but never loss infinite hope. now joining me now is host of tavis smily on pbs and the tavis smily show on public radio international. >> thank you. >> why are we going the wrong way against poverty in this country? >> the elite number one. they also don't contribute to the campaigns of t
, martin luther king jr. we will pause to remember dr. king's birthday and i'd like to bring in andrew young the third, former civil rights leader and ambassador andrew young. good to see you, sir. >> hey, craig, how are you doing? >> great. your father is a long time friend and confidant of reverend king. what have you learned from your father, and also, his generation as well? >> you know, i think that it is very important that we as americans today give each other a faith-saving way out, and that is one thing that my father was adamant about throughout his life is that when you have an opponent and have indifferences about a subject, that you give your opponent a way out. to keep his dignity and that is how you create change, and that is what dr. king and my father and dr. lowrie and others did during the civil rights movement when they were fighting bigotry. and unfortunately, that is what the president obama is going to to have to learn to do with the go gop. >> what are your thoughts as we get ready to see president obama sworn in for a second time tomorrow? >> i think that it's
complex. >> he continued for a cause he knew was right. that's the lesson of lincoln, of dr. king and president obama. dr. reverend walker who chaired dr. king used to always remind me of his favorite kwoet from dr. king. he would say you measure not a man by the way he is stands in time of convenience, but where he stands in the times of controversy. the president, now dr. king and even lincoln before. they stood in the most controversial and perilous times. people that show leadership and stability and vision and commitment when it's the most difficult of times. any one can shine when everything is going well. but it's when it is the darkest that we can see those that really bear the brightest lights. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >> hey, lance, tell us something we don't know. let's play "hardball. "hardbal. >> good evening. let's start with this. lance slide. it's not like we didn't see this coming for a long time. extra power or linebacker hoping for some extra muscle. no, lance armstrong was an international hero. a seven time-tour de fra
of the rainbow push coalition. a pleasure. >> thank you. >> thank you for being here. let's talk about dr. king and the perspective of what i said, 45 years since his death, but we have an african-american president for the second time taking office. give me your thautsds on that. >> there's immense pride in that. the fact is, for 244 years we were in slavery, the emancipation proclamation, jim crow, only free since 1966, from selma, alabama, really, to washington is quite a journey. the steps that he'll take the oath of office was built by ancestors who were enslaved, about 170 miles from jamestown, first landed in 1609. a lot ofs h s hahistory and loo across at the dr. king statue and lincoln memorial. the emancipation. a lot of stuff going down. i think dr. king, planning a poor people's campaign. beyond the issue of slavery, and segregation and the right to vote is access to a job, and so while we fought these big fights on fiscal cliff and debt ceiling, poverty is expanding. 50 million in poverty. food insecure, unemployed, and the disparity keeps growing, plus an impact of violence. so th
or to be doing in washington. the inauguration is on dr. martin luther king's birthday. >> the 21st of january. through four days prior on the 17th, we will be at george washington university for a live symposium on c-span and pbs and on public radio. we're talking specifically about how we get this president -- demanding, in fact, that he call a white house conference on the eradication of poverty. to his credit, the first thing he did four years ago when elector was on the lilly ledbetter. were demanding out what he called immediately on what has come for the on the eradication of poverty. let's craft a national plan to cut poverty and half in 10 years, to move toward eradicating it in 25 years. this is not a skill problem, it's a will problem. do we have the will to do this? if he wants to aim for the fences, if he wants to be a great american president, if he wants to leave behind a legacy -- and we read in the new york times from all his private talks with these his store and said that is what it wants to do, leave a legacy of the great transformational president -- we say take on the iss
] and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question -- what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. but there are as many right answers as there are people in this tent today and people in our country. eva spoke about how her parents inspired her. my parents certainly inspire me every day. but today, when i engaged in a service project with my husband mark, i will be thinking about my grandmother dorothy who started giving back when she was a child. she volunteered in her local school, helping to tutor migrant workers, farm children in southern california, in reading in english and writing. as she got older and had her own children, she provided school trips. she always wanted to cook an extra lunch for someone whose parents could not provide that for them. when she got older still, her children, including my mom, had left the hall. she became a big sister to mentor young girls like her who had been neglected and abused as a child. when she got older still and she could no
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
on the weekend in which we're celebrating dr. martin luther king's birthday, someone who was killed by a gun. in fact, the gun control act of 1968 was proffered in response to his assassination. that said, the day does not honor his legacy. the fact is it really besmirch whiceshis legacy. he was the apostle of non-violence. we have to go to what dr. king saw as being an american problem. he said more than 40 years ago we are the greatest purveyors of violence in the world today. there's a study that came out last week that reaffirmed that, that we are the most violent wealthy western nation. why is that. as you talk about jared loughner and white people and black people, the fact is we're killing each other in america. we, you, me, and ann need to sit down and talk about why it is america and americans are so violent. >> ann, what problem do you have with universal background checks. >> i don't. i don't at all. >> even for gun shows. >> gun rights supporters support that. >> now you're for expanding. >> wait, can i finish? >> you may follow up on the race issue. >> first of all, it's not tha
when dr. king spoke of his dream at the feet of lincoln. before that they were jailed in jackson, mississippi as defiant freedom riders risking life, limb and liberty for the cause of civil rights. and four years ago they were in tears as barack obama fulfilled the dream. >> it was just joyous. >> reporter: here they were again today, living proof of how far america can come in one lifetime. and like much of the crowd they were more subdued and reflective than they were during the first oath. >> every president has shortcomings and all have great hopes and dreams going into it and the cold hard reality of washington politics hits. >> what stories do you tell from this era to help kids understand how big this is. >> we went from this to this in your lifetime. >> the young persons found a cause and a reason to do what we did. there are causes that they, too, can find. >> what do you say to the 47% of americans who voted the other way? >> there are many points that we can all agree on. let's find those and work from there.
. we must continue to fight. it took the dr. kings, the rosa parks, to make it possible for us to have an open america. it took those that fought for gender equality and gay and l z lesbian rights and labor rights to open up america, it takes those of us now to continue to fight. we have gone through a turbulent time, we've gone through turbulent history. but we've not arrived yet. when you fly, you don't get off the plane when you get out of turbulence, you get off once you've reached your destination. until we get to the destination of this country, this nation living up to its creed, it will not be time for us to dislodge those that do what is necessary to keep this nation moving forward, both in office and those that are out of office and in the streets of this nation raising issues. that's what king day is about. that's what the victory of b arksz barack obama is a victory of. thanks for watching. a special live edition of "hardball" starts right now. >>> well, welcome, good evening, i'm chris matthews live from the news room in washington wra i've been all day. it's been a day o
, beverly mckinney sees living proof of dr. king's dream realized. >> you as an individual have the opportunity to make a difference in this world. if you don't do that, it was all nor naught. >> reporter: a message these former southern californians say has inspired own family. their son won the presidential award for academics and a trip they hope will stay with him forever. >> i tell my son, strive for the best, maybe you could be the first hispanic. >> and christin ayers is in washington for this morning's inaugural event. >> and she joins us by the phone from the national mall where the stage is set and security is mighty tight as well. good morning, give us your impressions. you've been there i would imagine several hours so far just going through security and whatnot, right. >> reporter: that's right, we have been here for hours and security is tight. we stood in line for about 3 1/2 hours trying to get through a media entrance and were later let through along with the rest of the general public. a chilly morning standing out and wait
't get it at first. then all of a sudden i said it's dr. king's birthday, the day we're going to celebrate. so it's been a wonderful day. i had the opportunity to post a lot of pictures of obama and dr. king on my website and do some things, have conversations with people about the struggle as well as how did -- or how they feel about obama becoming president and how they feel about him winning a second time around. >> what are you hearing? >> people are really, really pleased about that. in washington, d.c. of course, you know, this is a democratic town. we were so happy that the democrats won one more time. so i'm personally real pleased by that. >> one of the things people started to jump to conclusions, we're in a post-racial society right now. and we heard the conversation moving forward we still have a long way to go but he was elected a second time. that has to be another step in the right direction. >> you're absolutely right. at my age, i never thought that i would live to see this. and it has been such a blessing to me to have seen this. the only thing i wish, i kind
assessment -- martin luther king, jr. [applause] so the president will clearly be in the foreground, but dr. king looms large as the backdrop. now, word comes from the white house that they will use his bible for this historic and iconic celebration, so we will talk tonight about how we honor the legacy of dr. king by focusing more attention on the issue that he gave his life for -- the poor. king once said we have to civilize ourselves by the immediate abolition of poverty. obviously, we are not quite there yet, but we of tonight's conversation will aid us and of that as in trying to make sure that we look out for the least among us. i am pleased tonight to be joined by an all-star panel. i want to introduce them one by one and jumped right into the conversation. i want to start by thanking c- span for carrying this program live around the world tonight. [applause] thank you, c-span. as the conversation gets under way, we will tell you more about what you can do at home or wherever you might be watching tonight to join in the conversation, but for now, let me introduce the novice panel of
on the same day the nation pauses to remember civil rights legend and icon dr. martin luther king jr.. two men, two very different dreams forever linked. it is monday january 21st inauguration day and good morning. thank you for joining fox 5 special coverage. i'm allison seymour. >> i'm tony perkins. we are broadcasting from our temporary fox 5 studios high atop the canadian embassy. it's a beautiful building and a beautiful view. we are blocks from where all the accident gets underway. we will bring it all to you live all morning long as we mentioned earlier. this is president obama's 4th oath of office. he took his third yesterday. we'll show you a little bit of that. >> chief justice john roberts administered the oath. the president has two swearing in ceremonies because inauguration day fell yesterday. he had two of the first time around because he and justice roberts flood their lines during the public ceremony. >> vice president joe biden was also sworn in yesterday morning just as he administered his oath at the naval observatory. >> today's oaths will take place just before the noon h
our schools are setting up academies. dart -- dr. martin luther king academy of leadership and enterprise. or they will name them for langston hughes, frederick douglass. -- frederick douglass. i do not think a lot people should let the name the schools. [laughter] [applause] they should name it for people they do not like. [laughter] here are a few points. i will be unfashionable tonight. everyone in washington seems to think the way to solve the problems in our schools is to not give them another cent, another penny, to improve and make the schools look like places that are inviting and respect the value of children. aesthetics count. do not do that, but beat up on their teachers. that is the trend today. [applause] attack the unions. i heard about the teachers union from teachers in l.a. last fall. i flew to chicago to stand with them the day they went on strike. they were right to go on strike. [applause] i will tell you something. i am in schools all the time. when i was a young teacher, i remember this. schools are overwhelmingly -- the teachers are women. you go to a
, fittingly on this day, used by dr. martin luther king jr. the president will celebrate at two inaugural balls, versus the ten held four years ago. even if there's less fanfare, the day will not be without its pomp and circumstance. and star power. katy perry kicked things off at a concert earlier this weekend. ♪ at last >> reporter: and beyonce, whose rendition of edda james' "at last" was a highlight of the 2009 inauguration, will this time perform the national anthem, at the capitol ceremony. who can forget that moment in 2009. again, sasha pointed out, dad did not mess it up. he has one more shot at it. >> that's right, josh. >>> today, a day for poetry. the prose of governing comes next. and jonathan karl at the capitol for that. as the president prepares to deliver his speech, his team is gearing up for a lot of big debates ahead. >> reporter: you can see the presidential podium, still covered in plastic. it is from there that he will deliver one of the most important speeches of his presidency, hoping to set the tone for a second term that his aides say will be every bit as ambi
, they're going to try to do this. and we have to fight it. that's how we honor dr. king's dream. not by empty words and ceremonies but by doing what he did. action. get out there like martin iii and the rest of us and fight to fulfill the dream. not just give some words of ceremony about a dream that you will not make a reality. happy birthday, dr. king. the dream moves on. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> does gop mean guns over people? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. this afternoon two men were wounded in yet another school shooting. this time in st. louis. today's shooting comes as the republican party is siding with the folks out there who want lots of semiautomatic firepower to fight this country's elected government. so has it become the guns over people party? republican u.s. senator rand paul of kentucky talks about the president usurping the constitution. republican texas congressman steve stockman talks about impeaching the president if he takes steps to
cho, guys, thanks so very much. that's the dr. martin luther king float going right past the reviewing stand right now. the float's design featuring an image of dr. king and a representation of his quote, out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope. martin luther king jr. float on this martin luther king day. appropriate, appropriate float. as we watch what's going on. there's the president. he's with some of the tuskegee airmen being honored right now. our own fredricka whitfield, by the way, her dad, a tuskegee airman. one of the heroes of world war ii. who went in, fought for all of us against the nazis in europe. did brilliantly, even though they got inferior equipment. they really managed to become heroes. they're being well recognized, as they should be. >> a very special moment, president obama spending time with them. i do notice, it does appear as if the first lady, as well as malia and sasha have gone back into the residence. they seem to have left the reviewing stand. so the president is there. you also see the vice president biden and his family all still there as well.
championed the issues public safety and crime reduction. since the assassinations of dr. martin luther king and robert kennedy, we have pushed as an organization commonsense solutions to reduce the access to guns by those who simply should not have them. we have called for background checks for everyone who purchases a weapon, whether in a store or at a gun show. we have demanded that assault weapons and large capacity magazines designed to serve our military needs, but with no practical use on america's streets or in our neighborhoods the band. .. would move washington to action. once again we were wrong. but then december 14th, 2012, we all witnessed a tragedy in newtown, conn. that even after all of the others, we still cannot imagine. 20 children, ages 6 or 7 shot dead in sandy hook elementary school, six of their teachers and administrators. terrible, and forgivable moment in american history. we cannot get those lives back. we cannot get back the more than 30,000 lives lost each year to gun violence. but we can and we must act to help protect the lives of those in the future. this has
and vice president paid tribute to dr. king a second time, pausing at a bust of the slain civil rights leader in the rotunda. during the procession down pennsylvania avenue, the president and first lady walked part of the way and later took their place in the reviewing stand as the inaugural parade began. ♪ >> reporter: and the party continued into the night. ♪ he's president and he's on fire ♪ >> reporter: michelle obama wowed the audiences at two inaugural balls in a ruby chiffon and velvet gown by jason wu. but the celebration was not as grand as 2009 which saw the president and first lady attend ten balls. >> now that the parties are over the work on president obama's second term begins. susan mcginnis with more on that. good morning. >> reporter: anne-marie, good morning. yes, item number one is the debt limit. we learned on monday that the house will vote tomorrow on raising the debt ceiling for a period of three months, and the republicans have made a big concession. they had their dance and took a moment to savor the scene. now it's time to get ba
, bobby kennedy was her -- assassinated two days before i walked across the stage for graduation. dr. king, the one who got week engaged in politics, was assassinated earlier that year. even assassination attempt at a george wallace. it is no wonder things held together quite frankly. well, the congress passed what was then called the gun control act. among other things it said that felons, fugitives, drug users, those who have been adjudicated and it is not a politically correct phrase, but it is in the law, those that are mentally affected could not own a gun. 1994 as a world change in country changed, along with the thing i am proud is for having written and passed about. we added a new category of people who were prohibited from purchasing a gun. based on facts, not on fiction. that is those who had a restraining order issued against them in a domestic violence incident. that was a fight to get that added. then, two years later we expanded the list again to include anyone convicted of a misdemeanor violent crime, that they were the most likely people to do something. time and experienc
want everyone to pitch in for the national day of service. which honors dr. martin luther king, junior. and as you see here on the mall, lots of people are turning out to say hello but also to volunteer and to be part of the inaugural excitement. the president took his message online, as well. >> four years ago, my family celebrated inauguration weekend and martin lugar king day by rolling up our sleeves and lending a hand in our community. that's because inaugurations are about more than just celebrating. they're about coming to together to make our country a better place. it was one of the highlights of the weekend and this year we're going to do it again on saturday. >> the president and the first lady who took part in this national day of service. here they are at a washington school earlier today helping volunteers who were staining a book case. john berman very critical of the president's form in painting that book case. you've been rough on him, buddy. speaking of service though, next month, cnn will begin introducing you to heroes who make service a way of life. first take a lo
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